Psychology Staff overworked and under supported in light of Covid-19, reveals new findings

0 0
Read Time:2 Minute, 44 Second

In its second series of surveys of staff and students within psychology departments across the UK, 60 per cent of psychology university staff disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement that their workload was manageable during the pandemic. Only 51 percent of staff reported that their wellbeing needs had been met ‘somewhat’, or ‘to a great extent’ by their university.

However it was a more positive picture among students, with 75 per cent of students reporting that their wellbeing needs were being met ‘somewhat’ or ‘to a great extent’ by their university.

The surveys ran in November 2021, and were a follow up to previous research into the same topic in 2020, aimed to explore and update on key themes within the context of the Covid-19 pandemic, including satisfaction with how teaching and learning are being delivered now, how manageable workload is and whether wellbeing needs are being met by universities.

Professor Andy Tolmie, Chair, BPS Research Board
Chair of Psychology and Human Development at the UCL Institute of Educa
tion:

“These survey results confirm the impression held by many staff in psychology departments – that they have done very well in maintaining student engagement through a difficult period, but at substantial cost to their own wellbeing, and especially their capacity to progress research. It is crucial that universities – and research funders – acknowledge this impact and work to redress it.”

Key findings included:

STAFF:

  • Psychology staff felt overworked: three-fifths (60 per cent) of psychology university staff disagreed/strongly disagreed that their workload was manageable.
  • Staff also felt like they did not have enough time to undertake research: 79 per cent of staff disagreed/strongly disagreed that they had enough time to undertake research.
  • Only half (51 per cent) of staff reported that their wellbeing needs had been met ‘somewhat’ or ‘to a great extent’ by their university. About a third (35 per cent) reported their wellbeing needs had been met ‘very little’, while 13 per cent said their wellbeing needs had not been met at all.

STUDENTS:

  • Overall two-thirds (66 per cent) of psychology students strongly agreed/agreed that they were satisfied with how teaching was being delivered on their course. Students were most satisfied with teaching and learning when it was delivered face to face, or a combination of face to face and online. They reported the least satisfaction when teaching and learning were delivered entirely online.
  • Three-quarters (75 per cent) of students reported that their wellbeing needs were being met ‘somewhat’ or ‘to a great extent’ by their university.
  • Just over half (56 per cent) of psychology students strongly agreed/agreed that their workload was manageable.

The report recommends that universities explore ways to improve staff workload and to enable staff to undertake more research. Universities should investigate why students aged 21-25 year-old were less likely than students in other age groups to say their wellbeing needs were being met, with universities implementing a plan of long term support and solutions for staff and students alike.

Read the student report here

Read the staff report here

Psychology staff in universities across the UK felt overworked and under supported during Covid-19, new research from the British Psychological Society has revealed
Monday, June 20, 2022
Feature Image: 
Audience: 
Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Previous post Launch of major 200-acre New Stanton Park moves step closer
Next post Connecting South and Central Asia with TIR

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.