Faculty for Children, Young People and their Families Optimising outcomes for infants and children who experience early hospitalisation

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Welcome to the CYPF Virtual webinar 

Optimising outcomes for infants and children who experience early hospitalisation

As part of the CYPF Faculty webinar series Impacts on Development, this webinar will consider the impact of being born sick and/or early on development. Both barriers and buffers to optimal development will be explored. There will be consideration of the impact of early hospitalisation on the child and family across time illustrated by both research and stories from children and parents with lived experience. Examples of best practice and suggestions for interventions to prevent and reduce impact will also be made.

Learning outcomes from the Webinar:
Attendees will have an appreciation of developmental interrupters which can arise from early life experiences including being born sick/early and ensure questions about the area are part of the developmental history. You will see how early hospitalisation can impact be an attachment interrupter. You will also understand the impact of early hospitalisation on the family system and understand what can be done to buffer the negative impacts and promote best outcomes, you will gain information which can be used to inform own practice and that of other professionals.

Dates: 
Thu, 24/06/2021 – 12:00pm to 2:00pm
Programme: 

Speaker: 

Dr Nicola Doherty
Consultant Lead Clinical Psychologist

Nicola Doherty is a Consultant Lead Clinical Psychologist currently based in the Western Trust area of Northern Ireland where she leads the Paediatric Psychology Service.

Nicola is involved in various national and regional committees and working groups, mainly related to paediatrics, perinatal mental health, neonatal needs and infant health and wellbeing. Since qualifying as a Clinical Psychologist in 2000, Nicola has had ongoing clinical and research interest in various areas, including, paediatric cardiology, diabetes, acquired brain injury, neurodevelopmental conditions, child development, perinatal and infant mental health. 

She was awarded a Winston Churchill Travel Fellowship in 2017 which allowed her to research best practice in Canada and the USA for medically fragile babies and in 2020 became a Visiting Professor at Ulster University. She is currently chair of the Paediatric Psychology Network SIG and communications lead for Division of Clinical Psychology (NI). 

Nicola’s presentation is based on a number of sources: – CHIP studies (references below) – Doherty N.N. & Utens, E. ‘A Family Affair’, Chapter in Congenital Heart Disease and Neurodevelopment, 1st edition. Edited by Christopher McCusker and Frank Casey – Elsevier 2016. – – Doherty,N.N. & McCusker, C.G. ‘The Congenital Heart Disease Intervention Programme & Interventions in Infancy’ Chapter in Congenital Heart Disease and Neurodevelopment, 1st edition. Edited by Christopher McCusker and Frank Casey – Elsevier 2016. – Gower, C., Higgins, A., Doherty, N. & McCormack, D. (2016) Understanding the experiences of fathers of children with congenital heart disease: An interpretative phenomenological analysis. J. Health Psychology 22:1-11 McCusker, C.G., Armstrong, M., Mullen, M., Doherty, N.N. & Casey, F. A. (2013) A sibling controlled, prospective, study of outcomes at home and school in children with severe congenital heart disease. Cardiology in the Young, 23, 507-516. – McCusker, C.G., Doherty, N.N., Molloy, B., Rooney, N., Mulholland, C., Sands, A., Craig, B., Stewart, M. & Casey, F. A. (2012) A randomized controlled trial of psychological interventions to promote adjustment in school entry children with congenital heart disease and their families. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 37(10), 1089-1103. – Casey, F. A., Stewart, M., McCusker, C.G., Morrison, M. L., Molloy, B. Doherty, N.N., Craig, B., Sands, A., Rooney, N., Mulholland, H. C (2010). Examination of the physical and psychosocial determinants of health behaviour in 4 – 5 year old children with congenital heart disease. Cardiology in the Young., 20, 532-537. – Doherty, N. N., McCusker, C.G., Molloy, B., Mulholland, H. C., Rooney, N., Craig, B., Sands, A., Stewart, M. & Casey, F. (2009). Predictors of psychological functioning in mothers and fathers of infants born with severe congenital heart disease. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 27(4), 390-400. – – McCusker, C.G., Doherty, N.N., Molloy, B., Rooney, N., Mulholland, C., Sands, A., Craig, B., Stewart, M. & Casey, F. A. (2009) A controlled trial of early interventions to promote maternal adjustment and development in infants with severe congenital heart disease. Child: Care, Health and Development, 36(1), 110-117. – Tierney, N., Doherty, N., Casey, F., Craig, B. & Sands, A. (2008) Impact of an infant massage programme on maternal mental health and attachment. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology 26(3):256-271** – Research from the PRAMio (Parents professionals and mediators for infant outcome) group at QUB – ongoing – Work of Bruce Perry on trauma and importance of connectedness – Parent and children stories of lived experiences – Experiences gathered by Dr Doherty during her Churchill Memorial Trust Travel Fellowship of 2017 and work since. 

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Contact: 

01332 224509

bpsweb@kc-jones.co.uk

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