Challenging Disability – embracing human diversity

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This webinar is part of the taskforce series on diversity and inclusion.

Speaking to several experts by experience we will examine issues around disability by talking to psychologists with lived experience across a range of issues. Disability was incorporated into the Equalities Act 2010, but it is clear that there are many problems that still exist, in education, health, housing, social participation, employment, civic action, civic participation  and in the workplace to name but a few areas.

Becoming a psychologist can be challenging in itself without the added hurdles that may be presented by the discipline if you are a disabled person .

We will examine whether we need a much greater societal shift on how we view disability and whether diversity initiatives are really enough to create an inclusive society. 

The discussion will consider and debate intersectional issues around disability from a psychological perspective as well as looking at how we can move forwards in certain areas to create equal opportunities and fairness across the board.

This recent information from the Office of National Statistics released February 2021 highlights that we still have a work to do to create an equitable society. 

  • 23.0% of disabled people aged 21 to 64 years in the UK had a degree as their highest qualification compared with 39.7% of non-disabled people; 15.1% of disabled people had no qualifications compared with 5.4% of non-disabled people (year ending June 2020).
  • Around half of disabled people aged 16 to 64 years (52.1%) in the UK were in employment compared with around 8 in 10 (81.3%) for non-disabled people (July to September 2020); disabled people with autism were among those disabled people with the lowest employment rate.
  • A higher proportion of disabled people aged 16 years and over in England were involved in civic participation (41.5%), such as signing a petition or attending a public rally, than non-disabled people (35.1%) (year ending March 2019).
  • Disabled people aged 16 to 64 years in the UK were less likely to own their own home (40.9%) than non-disabled people (53.4%), and more likely to have rented social housing (at 24.9% compared with 7.8%) (year ending June 2020).
  • Disabled people’s (aged 16 to 64 years) average well-being ratings in the UK were poorer than those for non-disabled people for happiness, worthwhile and life satisfaction measures; average anxiety levels were higher for disabled people at 4.47 out of 10, compared with 2.91 out of 10 for non-disabled people (year ending June 2020).
  • The proportion of disabled people (13.9%) aged 16 years and over in England, who reported feeling lonely “often or always” was almost four times that of non-disabled people (3.8%) (year ending March 2019).
  • Around 1 in 7 (14.3%) disabled people aged 16 to 59 years in England and Wales experienced domestic abuse in the last 12 months, compared with about 1 in 20 (5.1%) non-disabled people; disabled women (17.5%) were more than twice as likely to experience domestic abuse in the last year than non-disabled women (6.7%) (year ending March 2020).

This event will be recorded 

 

Dates: 
Tue, 13/07/2021 – 4:30pm to 6:15pm
Programme: 

Rachel Miller will host the discussion. Rachel is a postgraduate health psychology student and member of the BPS presidential taskforce on diversity and Inclusion. Rachel has particular interests in disability and chronic illness. She also works supporting disabled students as a mentor at the University of Strathclyde. Having lived with chronic illness for 13 years, she is passionate about empowering others by sharing experiences, and talking about life with disabilities

Guests include

Angharad Jones will be a trainee clinical psychologist in September and has a disability. She has faced barriers accessing the profession due to ableism – discrimination in favour of non-disabled people – which she has written about for The Psychologist. “ For years, those of us with disabilities have asked for reasonable adjustments such as working from home, but we were told it wasn’t possible. Overnight in March 2020, this was granted to everyone. These adjustments were only made because non-disabled people were affected. This is what ableism looks like”.
“Less than half of courses have signed up to the Disability Confident scheme. The scheme is set up to improve employment prospects for those with disabilities, and I believe that all courses should use this scheme…” as we are employed by the NHS, which is a Disability Confident organisation. Angharad has a issued a call to the BPS and the HCPC to conduct research into the experiences of aspiring, trainee and qualified psychologists to understand and identify the different experiences between disabled and non-disabled psychologists.

Rupy Kaur. Currently working towards completing her training to be a Health Psychologist Rupy studies at Liverpool John Moore’s University and works in adult weight management. 
Rupy was born with cerebral palsy and is a full time wheelchair user working with personal assistants on a day to day basis to help her carry out daily tasks. 
Rupy identifies her main challenges as “… societal assumptions about what they believe I can and cannot do. Rupy says “ I have overcome these challenges through being vocal and fighting for my needs to meet” . 
Prescribing to the Social Model of Disability Rupy is passionate about improving the healthcare system for disabled people which is why she has chosen a career in health psychology

Dr Allan Laville is Dean for diversity and inclusion and an associate professor in clinical psychology at the university of Reading. Allan is also a member of the BPS taskforce on Diversity and Inclusion. Since 2011Allan has trained over 300 psychological wellbeing practitioners within the Charlie Waller Institute at the University of Reading. Allán is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and an Associate Fellow of the BPS, and in 2019 Allán won the Reading University Student Union Award for Diverse and Inclusive Teaching Excellence. Allán identifies as neuro-diverse and has experience of mental health considerations.

Following the airing of the pre-recorded section of our webinar attendees will have the opportunity  to engage with some of the members from this panel in a discussion hosted by chair of the presidential taskforce Dr Nasreen Fazal-Short. Nasreen a consultant clinical psychologist  now works in independent practice. She has been a director of psychological services in the NHS and is a graduate of the Nye Bevan Leadership Programme. Nasreen is passionate about inclusive practice and service delivery within all organisational structures.
 

About the organiser: 

Presidential Taskforce on Diversity and Inclusion

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Registration is FREE and available online only.

In order to register for the event, you will need to sign in using your log in details. If you are not a returning customer, you will need to create a free account.

Joining instructions will be sent the day prior to the event, these will be sent to your BPS registered email address.

 

This event will be recorded 

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This webinar is free to attend and open to BPS members and the general public. Registration is required. See Pricing tab for information.
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Have a query?

Contact [email protected]

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